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Births and deaths

 

All Local Authorities have a duty to improve the health of the population they serve. To help with this, we use data and information from a range of source data, including data collected at the registration of a birth or death to understand more about the health and care needs in the area.  Patients have the right to object to their data being shared. More information on data protection can be found here:

https://ico.org.uk/for-organisations/guide-to-data-protection/principle-1-fair-and-lawful/

Natural Change is the difference between the number of births and the number of deaths each year which, together with migration, are the main components of population change.  While the number of births rose significantly in 2008 and less so in 2009, they have since dropped slightly in 2010 and are trending back towards the 2009 high..  The number of deaths, however, has remained largely constant, with a small drop in 2011 and 2012 before returning to the downward trend set before 2011.  Consequently, Natural Change has also increased to its highest since 2009: (Figure 1).

Figure 1: Births and deaths

 

Births

Deaths

Natural Change

2001

1,704

1,336

368

2002

1,805

1,385

420

2003

1,804

1,380

424

2004

1,869

1,346

523

2005

1,922

1,345

577

2006

1,938

1,326

612

2007

1,928

1,340

588

2008

2,111

1,344

767

2009

2,162

1,325

837

2010

2,119

1,347

772

2011

2,088

1,269

819

2012

2,116

1,278

838

2013

2,074

1,330

744

2014

2,150

1,314

836

 

 

Births and deaths

 

Source: National Statistics 2016

 

Fertility

Bedford Borough’s General Fertility Rate1 (GFR) was 67.8 in 2014, higher than that of England (62.2) and the East of England (64.1).

It is also the highest it has been in the last ten years. This reflects the large increase in the number or births during 2008 and 2009, due in part, to the recent increase in migrants from the European Union Accession countries.

 

Mortality

Mortality rates in Bedford Borough are lower than those in the East of England and in England. (Table 1)

Table 1: Mortality Rates

 

Mortality Rate 2014 Bedford Borough East of England England
Crude2 801.59 884.56 863.23
Standard2 93.56 94.70 100
Source: National Statistics 2016

 

The crude rate has declined slightly over recent years in line with the national and regional rates, as has the standard rate.

The gap between the highest and lowest areas of deprivation within Bedford Borough has remained largely constant (Figure 2) with a significantly greater rate of mortality in the 20% most deprived areas compared to the 20% least deprived areas.

 

Figure 2: Deprivation gap

Births and deaths

 

Infant Mortality

 
 

High rates of infant mortality can be seen as a product of disadvantaged communities.  Although Bedford Borough had a higher rate of deaths under I year than the East of England and England and Wales in 2010, the actual number of deaths was small (10) and the higher rate cannot, therefore, be interpreted as significant.(Table 2). Deaths under 4 weeks and the perinatal mortality rate were both higher than the regional and national figures, but again actual numbers were low:

 

Table2: Infant Mortality, 2014

Age Bedford Borough  East of England England
Under 1 year4 4.7 3.6 3.9
Under 4 weeks5 3.7 2.7 2.7
Perinatal mortality6 9.2 6.6 9.4

Source: National Statistics 2016
Denotes a rate calculated from less than 20 events.

Causes of Death

The total number of deaths in the Borough has remained fairly constant in recent years.

Figure 3: Percentage of total mortalities, 2012-2014 in persons of all ages

Births and Deaths

Source: National Statistics 2016

Neoplasms (cancer) are responsible for over a quarter of deaths. A further quarter are caused by diseases of the circulatory system including heart disease and strokes.

Other main causes of death include pneumonia, bronchitis, emphysema and other COPD, and accidents

 

1 General Fertility Rate (GFR) is defined as the number of live births per 1,000 women aged 15-44, 2014

2 Crude Mortality Rate is the number of deaths per 100,000 population, 2014

3 Standard Mortality Rate is the number of observed deaths as a % of the expected deaths if the population of an area experienced the same age specific deaths as England, 2014

4 Deaths under 1 year per 1,000 live births

5 Deaths under 4 weeks per 1,000 live births

6 Stillbirths and deaths under 1 week combined per 1,000 live births

 

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